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Abstract

This paper considers the potential for supply-side climate policy to increase climate action, with a focus on crude oil producers and exporting countries. To date, supply-side policies have not been widely used in efforts to tackle climate change, and the emerging dialogue on the topic tends to focus solely on measures that can curtail and ultimately end fossil fuel production. These strategies, in combination with comprehensive and sustained demand-side climate policy actions, pose a threat to the value of fossil fuel resource endowments held by countries and companies alike.

Authors

Paul Zakkour

Visiting Researcher Paul Zakkour is a director of the consultancy Carbon Counts and a visiting researcher at KAPSARC. Paul has more than… Paul Zakkour is a director of the consultancy Carbon Counts and a visiting researcher at KAPSARC. Paul has more than 17 years’ experience in the field of climate change policy, regulation and economics. Among other work, Paul advised on the design of European CCS regulations in 2007/08 and on the UNFCCC’s CCS rules under the clean development mechanism in 2010/11. Paul holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Technology from Imperial College, London.

Expertise

  • Climate change
  • Paris Agreement

Publications See all Paul Zakkour’s publications

Wolfgang Heidug

Wolfgang Heidug

Senior Research Fellow Wolfgang is an expert on low-carbon energy technology policy with in-depth knowledge of the science and technology of CO2 capture… Wolfgang is an expert on low-carbon energy technology policy with in-depth knowledge of the science and technology of CO2 capture and storage, Prior to joining KAPSARC he was a senior adviser at the International Energy Agency in Paris. Wolfgang also has over 20 years of experience working with Shell International.

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