• Primary Program Energy Transitions and Electric Power
  • Research Interests energy transitions, electricity markets regulations and policy, Smart Grid, digitalization and innovation, power system modeling, renewable energy policy, and energy efficiency

Biography

Turki is a Senior Research Associate at KAPSARC. He worked in several government and multinational firms in Saudi Arabia and the United States in policy-related research, and economic and market analysis. His professional experience includes ABB, Woodward, Colorado Concept Coatings, and the Advanced Power Engineering Laboratory. Alaqeel holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering , Master’s Degree in Business Administration from Colorado State University, and Graduate Certificates in Power and Energy, and Finance. Dr. Alaqeel is a Senior Member of IEEE, and a founding member of the Saudi Association for Energy Economics. He is also a Certified Modular Advanced Control (MACH2) Engineer for Flexible AC Transmission Systems, and Qualified Railway Signaling Systems Engineer. Alaqeel is member of several technical committees in Saudi Arabia, GCC and internationally including Saudi Arabia Smart Grid Conference, cigre GCC-power trade and regulation, and “Climate and Environment” task force in Japan Think 20 (T20).

Publications

See all Turki’s publications
  • Discussion paper
  • Report
  • Data Insight
  • Commentary
  • External journal articles
Oman Electricity Sector: Features, Challenges and Opportunities for Market Integration

Oman Electricity Sector: Features, Challenges and Opportunities for Market Integration

This discussion paper is part of a KAPSARC research project initiated to develop insights that can facilitate the creation of a well-functioning integrated electricity market comprising the member states of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). The project identifies and examines the key issues affecting electricity market integration within the GCC and the wider Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and suggests the enablers needed to facilitate market integration. This report focuses on Oman’s electricity sector, the liberalization of which started in 2004. The country’s power reforms are now poised to move to the next level, with the aim of creating a more competitive electricity industry in the Sultanate. Key features of Oman’s electricity market, challenges, and opportunities for market integration identified in the paper include: Nearly one quarter of Oman’s domestic natural gas production is used to power electricity generation and water desalination plants. The government’s National Energy Strategy 2040 seeks to ensure the country’s long-term energy sustainability, in part through targeting that at least 10% of electricity output comes from renewables by 2025. The private sector now owns 100% of generation capacity in Oman’s main interconnected system (MIS), and efforts have started to privatize other transmission and distribution firms. Regulatory oversight through a financially and administratively independent regulator with an adequate mandate, the Authority for Electricity Regulation, has played a key role in improving the sector’s performance and has created confidence among new industry players. In future, Oman’s gas network may be included in the regulator’s remit. Oman intends to implement a new arrangement for the future procurement of electricity through the spot market by 2020.

May 29, 2019
Abu Dhabi Electricity Sector – Features, Challenges and Opportunities for Market Integration

Abu Dhabi Electricity Sector – Features, Challenges and Opportunities for Market Integration

The emirate of Abu Dhabi was the first in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) to design and implement reforms aimed at moving away from a wholly government-owned vertically-integrated electricity market structure. From 1998, Abu Dhabi introduced several policy, legislative, structural and institutional reforms to its electricity sector and the related water desalination industry. This analysis discusses reform initiatives, restructuring activities and key market players as well as the challenges and opportunities associated with increased participation in regional electricity trading. Key features of the emirate’s electricity market and challenges and opportunities associated with cross-border electricity trading include: Maintaining economically competitive self-sufficiency in power. Reducing the cost of electricity procurement by using regional interconnections is thus an emerging driver for market integration. With lower peak demand growth projections and the commissioning of a 5.6 gigawatt nuclear power plant, Abu Dhabi’s electricity sector is likely to produce larger power surpluses, encouraging cross-border electricity trading opportunities. The current single-buyer model provides limited ‘implicit’ competition in the procurement of bulk supply. There is little or no pressure on power generators to compete with others in day-to-day operations. Power trading prospects are also hampered by the lack of volume- and time-specific marginal costs. Abu Dhabi’s electricity and water producers do not receive explicit fuel subsidies. However, electricity tariffs are still heavily subsidized for many residential consumers. Abu Dhabi is exploring several options to further liberalize its electricity market. Electricity trading is likely to be recognized as a separate licensed activity, which is expected to give fresh impetus to electricity trading within Abu Dhabi, across the United Arab Emirates and throughout the Gulf region. The paper is part of a KAPSARC research project to develop insights that can facilitate the creation of a well-functioning integrated electricity market among members of the GCC and wider Middle East and North Africa region and to suggest potential enablers that could help to fill existing knowledge gaps for policymakers in the region and to facilitate ongoing efforts toward regional electricity market integration.

March 3, 2019
Temperature Trends Across Cities in Saudi Arabia

Temperature Trends Across Cities in Saudi Arabia

KAPSARC examined temperature data for 11 cities spread across Saudi Arabia over 10 years. Except for Makkah, all cities in Saudi Arabia were warmer in 2018 compared with the national 10-year average. 

September 15, 2019
Electricity Sector Reforms in Abu Dhabi and Oman: What Have We Learned?

Electricity Sector Reforms in Abu Dhabi and Oman: What Have We Learned?

Chile was the first country to reform its electricity sector. The reform program was first mooted when Chile’s National Energy Commission was established in 1978; it took off with the enactment of the country’s Electricity Sector Law in 1982. This law is still cited as landmark legislation in the electricity industry. Since then, many countries have implemented reforms to revamp their electricity sectors, such as the unbundling, privatization and independent regulation in England and Wales in 1989.

October 20, 2019

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