• Primary Program Markets and Industrial Development
  • Research Interests Enhanced oil recovery, carbon capture sequestration, energy efficiency and renewable technologies.
  • Status -

Biography

Shahd is a senior research associate in the Markets and Industrial Development program. A mechanical engineer by background, she previously worked at Chevron as a flare and relief systems engineer and a facilities engineer supporting upstream and downstream Chevron facilities worldwide, with consultations and technical services based in Houston, Texas and Bakersfield, California. Shahd holds a master’s degree in mechanical engineering with a focus on advanced energy systems from UC Berkeley and a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering with a concentration in manufacturing engineering from Boston University.

Publications

See all Shahd’s publications
  • Discussion paper
  • Commentary
  • External journal article
Cooperate or Compete? Insights from Simulating a Global Oil Market with No Residual Supplier

Cooperate or Compete? Insights from Simulating a Global Oil Market with No Residual Supplier

Structural changes in the global oil sector are disrupting conventional market dynamics and the roles played by competing and cooperating producers. Industry players are adjusting to the shale (or ‘tight’) oil revolution and the possibility of plateauing or peaking global oil demand. In particular, OPEC and Saudi Arabia, its top producer, are reshaping the organization’s role as the primary residual supplier to the world oil market. In recent years, OPEC has invited other major exporters, including Russia, to cooperate under the OPEC+ production agreement in an effort to stabilize prices.

6th August 2020
Simulating a Global Oil Market With No Residual Supplier

Simulating a Global Oil Market With No Residual Supplier

Motivation and objective of the study What if OPEC decided to abandon organizing residual production collectively, transitioning the world permanently to a competitive oil market? This commentary is based on a forthcoming KAPSARC paper, “Cooperate or Compete? Insights from Simulating a Global Oil Market with No Residual Supplier” (Rioux et al. 2020). It constructs scenarios in which OPEC members, or OPEC members other than Saudi Arabia, start behaving as competitive price takers in 2020 and stop participating as part of a collective residual oil supplier. This analysis employs a standard economic equilibrium model to simulate the transition to a purely competitive world oil market from 2020 to 2030.

16th July 2020

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