• Primary Program Energy Transitions and Electric Power
  • Research Interests Demand side management, energy efficiency, energy monitoring, consumer behavior, smart meters, intelligent systems, energy management systems, big data, smart grid, agent-based modeling and machine learning

Biography

Thamir is a senior research associate in the Energy Transitions and Electric Power program, currently focused on creating data-driven tools to identify and evaluate different energy market scenarios, as well as using “big data” technologies to better understand the impact of behavior and the environment on energy consumption. Thamer is interested in using technologies to facilitate better energy public policy and energy economical systems. He previously worked as a lecturer in Australia and also has entrepreneurial and industrial experience working on award-winning projects such as the Burj Khalifah Building Management System.

Publications

See all Thamir’s publications
  • Methodology papers
  • Reports
  • Data Insight
  • Instant Insights
  • Commentary
  • KAPSARC journal article
  • Think20 (T20)
The Circular Carbon Economy Index – Methodological Approach and Conceptual Framework

The Circular Carbon Economy Index – Methodological Approach and Conceptual Framework

The circular carbon economy (CCE) approach, developed during Saudi Arabia’s G20 Presidency and endorsed by G20 leaders and energy ministers, can be used as a framework for holistic assessments of all available energy and emission management technologies within the confines of a global carbon budget. KAPSARC’s Circular Carbon Economy Index project, launched in 2021, will develop a composite indicator (index) that measures and tracks country performance and potential on various dimensions of the CCE to support related policy discussions and planning.    

28th June 2021
Behavioral Aspects of Energy Transition: A KAPSARC-Energy Systems Catapult (ESC) Joint Methodological Report

Behavioral Aspects of Energy Transition: A KAPSARC-Energy Systems Catapult (ESC) Joint Methodological Report

KAPSARC’s work on innovation in electricity transitions has focused on unbundling services in the electricity sector (KAPSARC 2016) and developing the microeconomic foundation for a reliability service. Our research has investigated the experiences of industries resembling the electric power sector and those involved in the sharing economy that have recently faced technological disruptions. In Fuentes (2016), we argued that reallocating risk across the electricity market, and the apparent paradox between (spare) capacity and price signals (scarcity) could open up a new role for incumbent electricity firms. 

11th March 2020
Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Report of the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel, Volume 4: Decision XXXI/7 – Continued Provision of Information on Energy-Efficient and Low Global Warming Potential Technologies

Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Report of the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel, Volume 4: Decision XXXI/7 – Continued Provision of Information on Energy-Efficient and Low Global Warming Potential Technologies

In the context of accelerating climate change, cooling demand is also increasing rapidly. If unmanaged, this will result in a vicious circle, with increasing global warming through greater energy consumption combined with the use of higher GWP refrigerants. Addressing access to cooling and its adverse impacts has been a low priority historically, although this is rapidly changing. Cooling is included in all five themes at UNFCCC COP-26. The importance of a combined strategy to improve energy efficiency of cooling equipment while phasing down HFC refrigerants under the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol is increasingly being recognized as one of the biggest climate mitigation opportunities available today. At the 31st Meeting of the Parties in Rome on November 2019, Parties adopted Decision XXXI/7: Continued provision of information on energy-efficient and low global-warming- potential technologies  To request the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) to prepare a report for consideration by the Thirty-Second Meeting of the Parties addressing any new developments with respect to best practices, availability, accessibility and cost of energy-efficient technologies in the refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat-pump sectors as regards the implementation of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. This report builds on the 2018 report in response to Decision XXIX/10 and subsequent EETF reports in response to Decision XXX/5 and Decision XXXI/7. The TEAP EETF has compiled information on relevant funding agencies, technology options, costs, availability, accessibility, and best practices for maintaining and/or enhancing energy efficiency in refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat pump (RACHP) sectors while phasing down HFCs under the Kigali Amendment.   Please visit: Original report by TEAP 43rd meeting of the Open-ended Working Group of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol  Find information about the Energy Efficiency task force (EETF):    

1st July 2021
Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Report of the TEAP, Volume 2 Decision XXXI/7 – Continued Provision of Information on Energy-Efficient and Low Global Warming Potential Technologies

Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, Report of the TEAP, Volume 2 Decision XXXI/7 – Continued Provision of Information on Energy-Efficient and Low Global Warming Potential Technologies

In the context of accelerating climate change, cooling demand is also increasing rapidly. If unmanaged, this will result in a vicious circle, with increasing global warming through greater energy consumption combined with the use of higher GWP refrigerants. Addressing access to cooling and its adverse impacts has been a low priority historically, although this is rapidly changing. Cooling is included in all five themes at UNFCCC COP-26. The importance of a combined strategy to improve energy efficiency of cooling equipment while phasing down HFC refrigerants under the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol is increasingly being recognized as one of the biggest climate mitigation opportunities available today. At the 31st Meeting of the Parties in Rome in November 2019, Parties adopted Decision XXXI/7: Continued provision of information on energy-efficient and low global-warming – potential technologies To request the Technology and Economic Assessment Panel (TEAP) to prepare a report addressing any new developments with respect to best practices, availability, accessibility and cost of energy-efficient technologies in the refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat-pump sectors as regards the implementation of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol. TEAP Reports

1st September 2020
Crude Oil Use in the Saudi Electricity Sector

Crude Oil Use in the Saudi Electricity Sector

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has taken several measures to promote sustainability in its electricity sector. In 2016 and 2018, the government of Saudi Arabia introduced a range of reforms as part of Saudi Vision 2030 to modernize the economy and make it less reliant on oil revenues. They included raising domestic energy prices, prioritizing energy efficiency, and diversifying the country’s fuel mix.

29th September 2019
Beyond Smart Meters

Beyond Smart Meters

Over the last two decades, many countries have installed millions of smart meters to improve the efficiency, reliability, and quality of service in the electric power sector. Compared with traditional meters, smart meters measure consumers’ electricity usage at 5- or 15-minute intervals and communicate that usage and other data automatically to the utility. Both electricity consumers and their utility can benefit from smart meters. They provide more information to manage electricity consumption, improve power outage detection and restoration, enhance opportunities for additional value-added services such as billing options and time of use rates, lower the utility’s costs, and enable distributed energy resources like solar and storage.

11th July 2021
Saudi Arabia’s CO2 Emissions Steady in 2019 Ahead of Expected 2020 Fall Due to COVID-19

Saudi Arabia’s CO2 Emissions Steady in 2019 Ahead of Expected 2020 Fall Due to COVID-19

The 2019 data on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have just been released ahead of an expected large fall in CO2 emissions in 2020 due to the impact of COVID-19. On June 3, Enerdata released its data for Saudi Arabia’s 2019 emissions from fuel consumption, estimating them to remain stable at 526.84 million tonnes of CO2 (MtCO2), slightly down (-0.04%) from 527.05 MtCO2 in 2018.

12th July 2020
Saudi Arabia’s 2018 CO2 Emissions Fall Faster Than Expected

Saudi Arabia’s 2018 CO2 Emissions Fall Faster Than Expected

The Instant Insight published on December 03, 2019 (KS–2019-II16) was based on data downloaded from the following sources: Enerdata Global Energy & CO2 Database (www.enerdata.net), 9 September, 2019 Enerdata EnerDemand Database (www.enerdata.net), 9 September, 2019 Joint Organizations Data Initiative (JODI), 9 September 2019 The data used in the previous analysis has been updated by Enerdata, with material revisions to the estimates for 2018 carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Due to media interest in this topic, we have updated our analysis to reflect the most recent information (downloaded January 9, 2020). 

21st January 2020
What is Behind the Recent Fall in Saudi Arabia’s CO2 Emissions?

What is Behind the Recent Fall in Saudi Arabia’s CO2 Emissions?

The International Energy Agency has recently released data showing that in 2018 Saudi Arabia’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions fell by 15 million tonnes of CO2 (MtCO2), or 2.7%, from 577 MtCO2 to 562 MtCO2. This is significant as it is Saudi Arabia’s first large policy-induced reduction in CO2 emissions. It also highlights how Saudi Vision 2030’s economic transformation plans are helping to decouple its economic growth from its CO2 emissions. The Kingdom is now the fourth-fastest reducer of greenhouse gasses among the G20 group of countries.

4th December 2019
Measuring to Manage: The Case for Improving CO2 Monitoring and Reporting in Saudi Arabia

Measuring to Manage: The Case for Improving CO2 Monitoring and Reporting in Saudi Arabia

To support the transition to a circular carbon economy, there is an urgent need to develop robust domestic systems of carbon dioxide (CO2) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) monitoring and reporting in the Kingdom. Such systems provide the essential evidence base for domestic climate policymaking. Developing them will also be crucial in helping Saudi Arabia achieve its reporting commitments under the Paris Agreement on climate change from 2024 onward and gain international recognition for its CO2 mitigation efforts.

13th July 2021

Related workshops

See all workshops
14 Sep

Importance of Data and Policy Simulation…

The webinar is co-hosted with the Energy Innovation: Policy and Technology LLC organization. Saudi Arabia has launched the Circular Carbon Economy national program during G20 as a climate change mitigation scheme aimed to reduce, reuse, recycle, and remove the amount of carbon emissions being released into the atmosphere. Monitoring, measuring, and reporting carbon emissions are […]

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