• Primary Program Climate and Environment
  • Research Interests Energy Demand, Energy Efficiency, The Rebound Effect, Energy Subsidies and Welfare and Energy Price Reform
  • Status -

Biography

Anwar is a Research Fellow at KAPSARC, which he joined in 2012. His research largely focuses on energy demand, energy prices and subsidies, and energy efficiency. He leads a project on modelling final energy demand in Saudi Arabia and understanding the impacts of policies such as energy price reform. He has also led research on energy productivity and the embodied energy in international trade. Anwar holds a BEng in Electronic and Communication Engineering from the University of Liverpool and an MSc in Electrical Engineering from KAUST.

Publications

See all Anwar’s publications
  • Discussion papers
  • Instant Insights
  • Commentary
  • KAPSARC journal articles
  • External journal article
Modeling Industrial Energy Demand in Saudi Arabia and Understanding Its Drivers

Modeling Industrial Energy Demand in Saudi Arabia and Understanding Its Drivers

In 2016 Saudi Arabia’s industrial (or manufacturing) sector accounted for 30.3% of total final energy consumption (IEA 2018a). When non-energy use (mainly feedstock for the petrochemical subsector) is included, the industrial sector᾽s share of total final energy consumption rises to over 50%.

3rd December 2019
Welfare Implications of the Rebound Effect From More Energy-Efficient Passenger Cars

Welfare Implications of the Rebound Effect From More Energy-Efficient Passenger Cars

Improving the energy efficiency of passenger cars makes it cheaper to drive, allowing motorists to take to the roads more frequently. This additional driving, which offsets some of the expected energy savings from energy efficiency, is known as the rebound effect and is perceived negatively. This paper undertakes a cost-benefit analysis of the rebound effect following an energy efficiency improvement in passenger cars for 100 countries.

30th October 2017
Gasoline Demand, Pricing Policy and Social Welfare in Saudi Arabia

Gasoline Demand, Pricing Policy and Social Welfare in Saudi Arabia

In the face of low international oil prices, countries in the Gulf Cooperation Council recently implemented fuel price reform across a number of sectors. Saudi Arabia, for example, announced in December 2015 an increase in the gasoline price. We undertook a welfare analysis in this paper to estimate the net gain in social welfare that resulted from this price increase.

12th March 2017
Policymakers Guide to the Various Ways of Calculating Energy Productivity

Policymakers Guide to the Various Ways of Calculating Energy Productivity

The existence of multiple approaches to calculating energy productivity, with its resulting diverse outcomes, makes it difficult to draw meaningful comparisons between economies and monitor their progress over time. To understand better the implications of this, we conducted a systematic in-depth survey of the various approaches.

13th June 2016
Embodied energy in trade: What role does specialization play

Embodied energy in trade: What role does specialization play

In global discussions aimed at limiting greenhouse gas emissions, the national targets set by governments are tied to the energy used or emissions generated within national borders. However, international trade can confuse the accounting. Moving a factory across the border does not change the total emissions, only the country to which they are attributed. Because of this, there is a growing consensus that the embodied emissions in international trade may undermine efforts to mitigate climate change. This has led to a number of studies that investigate the embodied emissions in international trade. Their findings have consistently demonstrated that industrialized countries tend to be net importers of embodied energy and emissions, while developing countries tend to be net exporters. It is often assumed that the industrialized countries have “offshored” energy intensive industries to developing countries, which in turn have specialized in energy intensive production. Some countries have started to adopt national targets around energy productivity, an indicator that links energy use to gross domestic product. Energy productivity has recently gained increased interest because it accommodates economic growth, is conceptually tied to energy efficiency – seen by policymakers as a low cost solution to limiting emissions – and focuses attention on how to maximize the welfare extracted from the energy system. We examine the issue of offshoring and specialization through the lens of embodied energy. First, we calculate the embodied energy in the net exports of 41 economies. We then decompose the embodied energy in net exports for each economy into three effects – intensity, specialization, and the trade balance – to reveal why each economy is a net exporter or importer of embodied energy.

6th March 2015
Why Did Domestic Gasoline Prices Fall in Saudi Arabia?

Why Did Domestic Gasoline Prices Fall in Saudi Arabia?

What is behind the dramatic fall in gasoline prices? On May 11, 2020, Saudi Arabia slashed its domestic gasoline prices. The price of 91-octane gasoline fell from 1.31 to 0.67 Saudi Arabian riyals (SAR) per liter, while the price of 95-octane gasoline fell from 1.47 to 0.82 SAR per liter. As a result of these price reductions, domestic gasoline prices today are very close to those that prevailed before the gasoline price reform in 2018. As a result, some mistakenly believe that Saudi Arabia has introduced gasoline subsidies.

7th June 2020
Gasoline Price Reform in Saudi Arabia

Gasoline Price Reform in Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia has been adjusting gasoline prices on a quarterly basis since the start of 2019, with the most recent adjustment occurring on July 14, 2019. These adjustments depend on changes in international oil prices, and are smaller than the major changes in gasoline prices that occurred because of the energy price reforms of 2016 and 2018.

1st September 2019
Industrial Energy Consumption in Saudi Arabia

Industrial Energy Consumption in Saudi Arabia

In 2017, Saudi Arabia’s total final energy consumption was 140.7 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe). Total final energy consumption is defined as energy used by final consumers (or end users). It includes electricity use in residential buildings, gasoline use in cars, and fuel use by industries producing cement, chemicals, and steel.   

31st May 2020

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